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Annual Meeting 2015

Meeting Program

(Information is subject to change.)

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Tuesday, June 30, 2015

 

 

7:00 AM–6:00 PM

REGISTRATION OPEN – Registration Desk

 

 

7:00 AM–6:00 PM

SPEAKER READY ROOM OPEN – St. Lambert

   
6:30 AM–7:00 AM SUNRISE MINI COURSE COFFEE AND CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST – Mont Royal
   

7:00 AM–8:30 AM

SUNRISE MINI COURSE – Mont Royal
(Separate Registration Required)

  Life in the Genetic Fast Lane: Gene Manipulation and Genome Editing to Understand Congenital Diseases
  Organized by the Education Committee, Chairperson, Janet Hardy, ECC Population Health
7:00 AM–7:45 AM New Techniques in Gene Manipulation and Genome Editing in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Animal Models
  Yojiro Yamanaka, McGill University
   
7:45 AM–8:30 AM Genetically Modified Models to Understand Congenital Diseases: To Boldly Go Faster and Further than Anyone Has Gone Before
  Richard H. Finnell, The University of Texas, Austin
   
8:30 AM–9:00 AM ROBERT L. BRENT LECTURE – Westmount
(Joint with OTIS)
  Genetic Mutations Cause Many Birth Defects: What We Learned from the FORGE Canada Project
  Chairperson: Tacey E.K. White, Exponent
  Jan M. Friedman, University of British Columbia
   

9:00 AM–12:30 Noon

PUBLIC AFFAIRS SYMPOSIUM – Westmount
(Joint with INA, NBTS, and OTIS)

  Microbiomes: An Underappreciated Organ for Teratologists
  Chairpersons: Lori L. Driscoll, Colorado College and Carl L. Keen, University of California, Davis
9:00 AM–9:05 AM   Introduction
     
9:05 AM–9:45 AM S19 Measuring the Impact of Diet and Environment on Infant Metabolism and the Microbiome
    Carolyn M. Slupsky, University of California, Davis
     
9:45 AM–10:25 AM S20 Impact of Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Other Perinatal Interventions on the Infant Gut Microbiome
    Anita L. Kozyrskyj, University of Alberta
     
10:25 AM–10:40 AM   Break — Fontaine B
     
10:40 AM–11:20 AM S21 Maternal Stress and the Neonate Gut Microbiome: Effects on Early Life Programming and Neurodevelopment
    Eldin Jasarevic, University of Pennsylvania
     
11:20 AM–12:20 PM S22 Elsevier Distinguished Lecturer
    Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: From Neurodevelopment to Behavior
    John F. Cryan, University College Cork
     
12:20 PM–12:30 AM   Discussion: What Does the Future Hold?
   
9:00 AM–12:30 PM Platform Session 3 – Mont Royal
  Developmental Toxicity of Pharmaceutical Products
  Chairpersons: Jan M. Friedman, University of British Columbia and
Kary E. Thompson, Bristol-Myers Squibb
9:00 AM–9:15 AM   Introduction
     
9:15 AM–9:30 AM 21 First Trimester Exposure to Citalopram and the Risk of Major Congenital Malformations in a Cohort of Depressed Women
    Zhao JPZ1,2, Sheehy OS1, Iessa NI1,2, Bérard AB1,2. 1CHU Ste-Justine Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada, 2University of Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada.
     
9:30 AM–9:45 AM 22 Venlafaxine, a Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor, Induces Fetal Heart Defects in the Rat
    Huang C1, Ernest SR1, Laurent L2, Bérard A3, Vaillancourt C2, Hales BF1. 1McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, 2INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier and Centre de Recherche BioMed, Montréal, QC, Canada, 3Sainte-Justine Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada.
     
9:45 AM–10:00 AM 23 Maternal Treatment with Venlafaxine, a Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor, Alters Placental and Fetal Heart Serotonin Systems in the Rat
   

Laurent L1, Huang C2, Ernest SR2, Hales BF2, Vaillancourt C1. 1INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier and Centre de Recherche BioMed, Laval, QC, Canada, 2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.

     
:00 AM–10:15 AM 24 Congenital Anomalies in Children of Mothers with Antiepileptic Drugs According to Periconceptional High Dose Folic Acid Use: A Population-Based Cohort Study
    Ban L1, Fleming KM1, Doyle P2, Smeeth L2, Hubbard RB1, Fiaschi L1, Tata LJ1. 1University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 2London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
     
10:15 AM–10:30 AM 25 Preconception Treatment with Antiepileptic Drugs and the Occurrence of Fetal Chromosomal Abnormalities: Insights from the North American AED Pregnancy Registry
   

Cramoy CC1, Liu Z1, Quirk MN2, Holmes LB2. 1University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Dept. of Nutrition, Amherst, MA, United States, 2North American AED Pregnancy Registry, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States.

     
10:30 AM–10:45 AM   Break—Fontaine B
     
10:45 AM–11:00 AM 26 Pregnancy Outcome in Women Treated with Etanercept: An Update on the OTIS Autoimmune Diseases in Pregnancy Project
   

Chambers CD, Johnson DL, Luo Y, Jones KL. University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States.

     
11:00 AM–11:15 AM 27 A Study for Effects of Onartuzumab on Embryo-Fetal and Pre- and Postnatal Development When Administered Intravenously Once Weekly for up to 23 Weeks to Pregnant Cynomolgus Monkeys (Enhanced Design)
    Halpern W1, Prell R1, Chihaya Y2, Arima A2, Nijem I1, Tarrant J1, O'Mahoney J1, Kaur S1. 1Genentech, South San Francisco CA, United States, 2SNBL Ltd, Kagoshima, Japan.
     
11:15 AM–11:30 AM 28 HAART Use during Pregnancy and the Risk of Major Congenital Malformations
    Bérard AB1,2, Sheehy OS1, Bernatsky SB3, Boucher MB1. 1CHU Ste-Justine, Montréal, QC Canada, 2University of Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada, 3McGill University, Montréal, Canada.
     
11:30 AM–11:45 AM 29 Early Vaginal Opening in Female Rats Given Braf-Inhibitor Dabrafenib is Not Associated with Early Physiological Sexual Maturation
   

Posobiec LM, Vidal J, Laffan S, Hart T, Hughes-Earle A. GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, PA, United States.

     
11:45 AM–12:00 Noon 30 A Comparison of Rat and Rabbit Developmental Toxicity Study Outcomes of More Than 400 Pharmaceutical Compounds
   

Piersma AH1,8, Theunissen PT2, Beken S4, Cappon GD3, Chen C5, Harrouk W9, Hoberman AM6, van der Laan JW2, Stewart J7. 1RIVM, Bilthoven, Netherlands, 2CBG-MEB, Utrecht, Netherlands, 3Pfizer, Groton, CT, United States, 4FAMHP, Brussels, Belgium, 5ILSI-HESI, Washington, DC, United States, 6Charles River Labs, Horsham, PA, United States, 7AstaZeneca, Macclesfield, United Kingdom, 8IRAS, Utrecht, Netherlands, 9US Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC, United States.

     
12:00 Noon–12:15 PM 31 US Food and Drug Administration Systematic Review of Pregnancy Registries: Follow-up Analysis
    Sahin L1, Hammad H2, Bird S2, Gelperin K2, Hampp C2, Leishear K2, Taylor L2. 1US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of New Drugs, Division of Pediatric and Maternal Health, Silver Spring, MD, United States, 2US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology, Division of Epidemiology I, Silver Spring, MD, United States.
     
12:15 AM–12:30 PM 32 Classification of "Mild" Heart Defects: Challenge for Pregnancy Registries
   

Holmes LB1, Meedzan B1, Beroukhim R2. 1North American AED Pregnancy Registry, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States, 2Pediatric Cardiology, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States.

   
12:00 Noon–1:30 PM LUNCH ON YOUR OWN
   
12:30 PM–1:30 PM  MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE MEETING—Fontaine H
   
12:30 PM–1:30 PM  PUBLIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE MEETING—St. Pierre
   
12:30 PM–1:30 PM  WEB SITE COMMITTEE MEETING—Fundy
   
1:30 PM – 3:30 PM ILSI HESI WORKSHOP – Westmount
  Contraception in Clinical Trials: From Animal Data to the Patient
  Chairperson: Jane Stewart, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals and Belen Tornesi, AbbVie Inc.
1:30 PM–1:35 PM   Introduction
    Jane Stewart, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals
     
1:35 PM–2:05 PM W8 How Do We Use Animal Data to Determine Contraception for Subjects in Clinical Trials?
    Susan Kindig, Eli Lilly and Company
     
2:05 PM–2:35 PM W9 Guidelines for Contraception in Clinical Trials: How Are These Guidelines Used by the Pharmaceutical Companies?
    Monali Desai, AbbVie Inc.
     
2:35 PM–3:05 PM W10 Assessment of Drug Interaction Potential of Novel Medicines with Hormonal Contraceptives
    Glen Carlson, AstraZeneca
     
3:05 PM–3:30 PM   Deliberate and Unintentional Pregnancy Exposure in Clinical Trials: What Can We Learn?
    Monali Desai and Belen Tornesi, AbbVie Inc.
   

3:30 PM–3:45 PM

BREAK – Fontaine B

   
3:45 PM–6:00 PM GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS OF COMMON MALFORMATIONS SYMPOSIUM – Westmount
 

Chairpersons: Suzan L. Carmichael, Stanford University and John M. Graham, Cedars-Sinai

3:45 PM–3:55 PM   Introduction
    John M. Graham, Cedars-Sinai
     
3:55 PM–4:20 PM S23 Clubfoot
    Carlos A. Bacino, Texas Children’s Hospital
     
4:20 PM–4:45 PM S24 Congenital Heart Defects
    Seema R. Lalani, Baylor College of Medicine
     
4:45 PM–5:10 PM S25 Infantile Hydrocephalus as a Complex Interplay between Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors
    Hannah Tully, Seattle Children’s Hospital
     
5:10 PM–5:35 PM S26 Genetics and Gene-Environment Interaction from the Epidemiologic Perspective
    Suzan L. Carmichael, Stanford University
     
5:35 PM–6:00 PM   Discussion
   
4:00 PM–6:00 PM

THE PREGNANCY AND LACTATION LABELING RULE SYMPOSIUM: IT'S HERE, NOW WHAT? – Verdun

 

(Joint with OTIS)

  Chairpersons: Christina D. Chambers, University of California, San Diego and Melissa S. Tassinari, US Food and Drug Administration
4:00 PM–4:05 PM   Introduction
    Melissa S. Tassinari, US Food and Drug Administration
     
4:05 PM–4:20 PM S27 Overview of the Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule
    Leyla Sahin, US Food and Drug Administration
     
4:20 PM–4:35 PM S28 Integrating Animal and Pharmacology Data in the New Label
    Susan B. Laffan, GlaxoSmithKline
     
4:35 PM–4:50 PM S29 Clinical Data in the Label: Evaluating Sources of and Reliability of Clinical Data
    Christina D. Chambers, University of California, San Diego
     
4:50 PM–5:05 PM S30 Considerations for Populating the Lactation Section, 8.2
    Jason Sauberan, Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego
     
5:05 PM–5:25 PM S31 Translating the New Labels to the Patient: A Clinician’s Perspective
    Megan E. B. Clowse, Duke University
     
5:25 PM–6:00 PM   Panel Discussion
    Christina D. Chambers, University of California, San Diego; Megan E.B. Clowse, Duke University; Beth Conover, OTIS Counselor; J. Edward Fisher Jr., US Food and Drug Administration; Susan B. Laffan, GlaxoSmithKline; Leyla Sahin, US Food and Drug Administration; Jason Sauberan, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego; Melissa S. Tassinari, US Food and Drug Administration; Tacey E. K. White, Exponent
   
6:00 PM–8:00 PM POSTER SESSION 2 AND EXHIBITS ATTENDED– Fontaine B
Click Here to Browse Posters

Poster Session 2
(Presenter designated by underlined author.)

Clinical Teratology

P30      Antenatal Suspicion and Postnatal Presentation of Scimitar Syndrome
Toufaily MH1,2, Roberts DJ3, Westgate MN1,2, Holmes LB1,2. 1Medical Genetics Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States, 2Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States, 3Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.

P31      Urethral Atresia: Prenatal Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and Outcome
Toufaily MH1,2, Roberts DJ3, Westgate MN1,2, Holmes LB1,2. 1Medical Genetics Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States, 2Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States, 3Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.

P32      A KAP Survey amongst Health Care Professionals on Birth Defects in Grenada
Fakoya FA, Ilesanmi A, Wade A, Hegamin-Younger C. St. George’s University, St. George’s, Grenada.

P33      Describing the Global Burden of Neural Tube Defects: A Systematic Literature Review
Zaganjor I1, Sekkarie A1, Tsang BL1, Williams J1, Razzaghi H2, Mulinare J2, Sniezek JE1, Cannon MJ1, Rosenthal J1. 1CDC National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Atlanta, GA, United States, 2Carter Consulting Inc., Atlanta, GA, United States.

P34      Folic Acid Use in Women before and during Pregnancy: A United Kingdom Primary Care Prescribing Study
Ban L, Fleming KM, Fiaschi L, Tata LJ. University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

P35      The Role of Folic Acid in the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects
Vereczkey A1, Czeizel AE2. 1Versys Clinics Human Reproduction Institute, Budapest, Hungary, 2Foundation for the Community Control of Hereditary Diseases, Budapest, Hungary.

P36      Birth Outcomes and Risk or Protective Factors of Ventricular Septal Defects during Pregnancy
Vereczkey A1, Czeizel AE2. 1Versys Clinics Human Reproduction Institute, Budapest, Hungary, 2Foundation for the Community Control of Hereditary Diseases, Budapest, Hungary.

P37      Birth Defects and Growth Restriction in Term and Late Preterm Singletons with Cerebral Palsy or Neonatal Death
McIntyre S1,3, Blair E3, Badawi N2,1, Nelson KB4,5. 1Cerebral Palsy Alliance, Sydney, Australia, 2University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 3Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia, 4Children’s National Medical Centre, Washington, DC, United States, 5NINDS/NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States.

P38      Possible Infant Exposure Pathways to Cronobacter Species in Homes
Chan MY1,4, Zambrana J1,4, McIntosh TG1,4, McKenzie M1,4, Williams A1,4, Smith MA1,4. 1Department of Environmental Health Science, Athens, GA, United States, 2Center for Food Safety, Athens, GA, United States, 3Regenerative Bioscience Center, Athens, GA, United States, 4University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States.

Environmental Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment

P39      Developmental Toxicity Study of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles by Oral Administration in Rats
Lee J1, Yu W-J1, Song J1, Sung C1, Lee S-Y1, Park J-D1, Jeong EJ1, Chung M-K1, Park K2. 1Division of Toxicological Research and Evaluation, Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea, 2College of Pharmacy, Dongduk Women’s University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

P40      Gene Expression Changes in the Testes and Prostate from Postnatal Day 30 Sprague-Dawley Rats Dosed Perinatally with Oxybenzone-Preliminary Study
Nakamura N1, Inselman AL1, Han T1, Fuscoe JC1, Harrouk W2, McIntyre B3, Foster PM3, Hansen DK1. 1National Center for Toxicological Research, US FDA, Jefferson, AR, United States, 2Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, US FDA, Silver Spring, MD, United States, 3National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States.

P41      Reproductive and Systemic Toxicity Analysis of LMFP, a Lithium-Ion Battery Component
Johnson KJ, Zablotny CL, Stebbins KE, Andrus AK. The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, United States.

P42      The Role of Fertility Restoration in the Maintenance of Antioxidant Enzymes after Transient Heat Stress in Mice
Chu SB, Lin C, Park SG, Yon J-M, Gwon LW, Lee BJ, Yun YW, Nam S-Y. College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.

P43      Exposure to an Environmentally Relevant Mixture of Brominated Flame Retardants Interferes with Skeletal Ossification
Yan H1, Tung EWY2, Lefèvre PLC1, Berger RG1, Paradis FH1, Wade MG2, Robaire B1,3, Hales BF1. 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, 2Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.

P44      Harm Reduction Tobacco Induces Bone Teratogenicity via Oxidative Stress
Sparks NRL, zur Nieden NI. Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program and Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, United States.

P45      Maternal Tobacco Use As a Risk Factor for Small for Gestational Age (SGA) is a Third-Trimester Effect
Afari-Dwamena NA1,2, Ferdosi H1,2, Dissen E1, Li J1,4, Chen R3, Feinleib M5, Lamm SH1,5,6, Polifka J7. 1Consultants in Epidemiology and Occupational Health, LLC, Washington, DC, United States, 2George Washington University, Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, DC, United States, 3Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States, 4Georgetown University, Centers for New Designs in Learning and Scholarships, Washington, DC, United States, 5Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States, 6Georgetown University School of Medicine, Pediatrics, Washington, DC, United States, 7Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.

P46      Are Residents of Coal Mining Counties More Likely to Have Infants with Birth Defects?
Lamm SH1,2,3, Afari-Dwamena NA1, Ferdosi H1,4, Qian L1,5. 1Center for Epidemiology and Global Health (CEOH), Washington, DC, United States, 2Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University-Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States, 3Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, United States, 4Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC, United States, 5Department of Mathematics and Statistics, American University, Washington, DC, United States.

P47      Associations between Maternal Periconceptional Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Major Noncardiac Birth Defects
Canfield MA1, Hoyt AT1, Romitti PA2, Botto LD3, Anderka MT4, Krikov S3, Tarpey M1, Feldkamp ML3. 1Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, TX, United States, 2Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States, 3Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, 4Massachusetts Center for Birth Defects Research and Prevention, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.

P48      Carbon Monoxide Exposure and Detection in Pregnancy: Case Studies from the California Poison Control System
Dodd-Butera T1,2, Beaman M1, Flores K2,3, Broderick Pritty M4, Chambers C3, Clark RF4. 1California State University, San Bernardino, College of Natural Sciences, San Bernardino, CA, United States, 2San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA, United States, 3University of California, San Diego, Department of Pediatrics, La Jolla, CA, United States, 4California Poison Control System, San Diego Division, San Diego, CA, United States.

P49      Sensitivity of Air Pollution Exposure Estimates to Exposure Assessment Decisions: Maternal Exposures to Ambient PM2.5 and Benzene
Tanner JP1, Salemi JL2, Yu H1, Jordan MM3, DuClos C3, Cavicchia P3, Correia J3, Watkins SM3, Kirby RS1, Stuart AL1. 1University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States, 2Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States, 3Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, FL, United States.

P50      Associations between Exposure to Ambient Benzene and PM2.5 during Pregnancy and the Risk of Selected Birth Defects in Offspring
Salemi JL2, Tanner JP1, Stuart AL1, Jordan MM3, DuClos C3, Cavicchia P3, Correia J3, Watkins SM3, Kirby RS1. 1University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States, 2Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States, 3Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, FL, United States.

P51      Impact of In Utero Exposure of Lead (Pb), Arsenic (As), and Zinc (Zn) on the Neurodevelopment of Young Children from Birth to 36 Months of Age: A Birth Cohort Study in Chitwan Valley, Nepal
Parajuli RP1, Umezaki M2, Fujiwara T3, Watanabe C2. 1The Environmental Health Sciences Lab, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, 2Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo Ku, Tokyo, Japan, 3Department of Social Medicine National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan.

P52      Contribution of Arsenic and Lead in Residential Soils to the Risk of Major Congenital Anomalies in England
Othman F1, Gibson JE1, Ander L2, Cave M2, Tata LJ1. 1University of Nottingham, Epidemiology and Public Health, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 2British Geological Survey, Environmental Science Centre, Keyworth, United Kingdom.

P53      Maternal Occupational Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Major Structural Birth Defects
Lim H1, Agopian AJ2, Whitehead LW2, Beasley CW3, Langlois PH4, Emery RJ2, Waller DK2. 1National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States, 2University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, TX, United States, 3University of Texas School of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States, 4Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, TX, United States.

P54      Residential Agricultural Pesticide Exposures and Risks of Selected Birth Defects among Offspring in the San Joaquin Valley of California
Carmichael SL1, Yang W1, Roberts E2, Kegley SE3, Brown TJ3, Lammer EJ5, English PB4, Shaw GM1. 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, 2Public Health Institute, Oakland, CA, United States, 3Pesticide Research Institute, Berkeley, CA, United States, 4California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA, United States, 5Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA, United States.

P55      Diet Quality, Obesity, and Birth Defects
Carmichael SL1, Yang W1, Gilboa S2, Ailes E2, Correa A3, Botto L4, Feldkamp M4, Shaw GM1. 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, 2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States, 3University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, United States, 4University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, United States.

P56      Development of a Noncancer Toxicity Criterion Using Developmental Toxicity Data As the Most Sensitive Endpoint in Estimating Health Risk(s) from TEG-Contaminated Coffee
Hixon ML, Mayfield D, Peterson MK, Dube E, Beyer L. Gradient, Cambridge, MA, United States.

Experimental Models

P57      Preliminary Assessment of F344-Sasco Rats As a Developmental Toxicity Research Model for Effects on Pregnancy Maintenance and Eye Malformations: Pilot Study with Trichloroacetic Acid
Narotsky MG1, Best DS1, Rubin Z2, Winters BR3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States, 2University of North Carolina, College of Arts and Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, 3University of North Carolina, Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.

P58      Modification of the Astroff Frozen Head Evaluation for Rat Fetuses
Seethala R, Olitan TA, Thompson KE. Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, New Brunswick, NJ, United States.

P59      Investigating Additional Differentiation Endpoints in the Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Test
Inselman AL1, Hansen DK1, Harrouk W2, Fisher JE2, Tassinari MS2, Nolen GT1, Merry GE1, Chen X1. 1National Center for Toxicological Research, US FDA, Jefferson, AR, United States, 2Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, US FDA, Silver Spring, MD, United States.

P60      Timing of Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Assessments: Four versus Five Days Post Fertilization
Gurrola-Gal MC, Brannen KC. Charles River Laboratories, Horsham, PA, United States.

P61      Comparison of Human Neural Progenitor and Differentiated Human Neuronal Cells for In Vitro Tests of Neurotoxicity
Amosu M1, Wallace S2, Majumder A2, Bian X1, Lu K1, Stice S1,2, Smith MA1. 1University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States, 2ArunA Biomedical, Inc., Athens, GA, United States.

P62      Anchoring a Dynamic In Vitro Model of Human Neuronal Differentiation to Key Processes of Brain Development In Vivo
Wegner SH
, Stanaway IB, Hermsen SAB, Kim HY, Park JY, Griffith WC, Hong S, Faustman EM. University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.

P63      In Silico Prediction of Teratogenicity: A Novel Semiautomated Mechanistic Expert Call Dataset Analysis Approach
Plante JP, Fowkes A, Surfraz MB. Lhasa Limited, Leeds, United Kingdom.

P64      Atlas for Skeletal Development in Cynomolgus Monkey Fetuses
Da Silva M, Dauzat C, Spézia F, Singh P, Foulon O, Forster R. CiToxLAB France, Evreux, France.

P65      Wistar Han IGS® Rats and CD®-IGS Rats: Comparison of Development and Behavioral Data
Barbeau S, Martin A, Primakova I, Pouliot L, Adamo M, Robinson K. Charles River Laboratories, Senneville, QC, Canada.

P66      Measurements of Growth in Nonrodent Juvenile Toxicology Studies
Robinson K, Adamo M, Martin A, Samadafan R. Charles River Laboratories, Senneville, QC, Canada.

P67      Postnatal Cardiovascular Assessments in Nonclinical Pediatric Studies in Juvenile Beagles Using Jacketed External Telemetry
Adamo M, Matheson R, Norton K, Robinson K. Charles River Laboratories, Montréal, QC, Canada.

P68      Parenteral Dosing Routes in Juvenile Mice: Comparison of Growth and Development to Orally Dosed and Untreated Juvenile Mice
Martin A1, Felx M1, Lewis E2, Pouliot L1, Robinson K1. 1Charles River Laboratories, Senneville, QC, Canada, 2Charles River Laboratories, Horsham, PA, United States.

P69      A Qualification Intravenous Infusion Study in Juvenile Sprague-Dawley Rats
Gordon C, Galicia A, Maghezzi MS. CiToxLAB North America, Laval, QC, Canada.

P70      Control Data from Sprague-Dawley Rat Juvenile Toxicity Studies: Part 1
Parker RM, Williams D, Baxter GE. Huntingdon Life Sciences, East Millstone NJ, United States.

P71      Control Data from Sprague-Dawley Rat Juvenile Toxicity Studies: Part 2
Baxter GE, Williams D, Williams RM. Huntingdon Life Sciences, East Millstone NJ, United States.

P72      Development of an Epaxial Intramuscular Injection Technique in Juvenile Rats
Baxter GE, Croft L, Callahan J, Parker RM. Huntingdon Life Sciences, East Millstone, NJ, United States.

P73      The Extended One-Generation Reproductive Toxicity Study (EOGRTS): An Update on Current European Legislation and Considerations for Implementation
Beekhuijzen MEW1, Marsden E2, Sloter ED3. 1WIL Research Europe, Den Bosch, Netherlands, 2WIL Research Europe, Lyon, France, 3WIL Research US, Ashland, OH, United States.

P74      Weight of Evidence Considerations for Determining the Necessity of a Developmental Immunotoxicity (DIT) Cohort in an EOGRTS (OECD 443) within the REACH Framework
Foreman JE, North CM, Goyak KO, Ketelslegers H, Minsavage GD. ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Inc., Annandale, NJ, United States.

 

 

   
   

 

 





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